Insights from Jeanne Jennings

Vice President, Global Strategic Services, Alchemy Worx

The Creepy Side of Email and Big Data

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Jeanne Jennings
is Vice President of Global Strategic Services at Alchemy Worx, the world’s largest email marketing agency. She is a recognized expert in the email marketing industry with more than 20 years of experience.

Personalization is touted in email circles as a positive. I tell clients all the time that including a recipient's first name and other personal details in a message has been shown to increase engagement. But there are times when personalization can be creepy.

Take a look at the screenshot below (I cut out the middle of the mail to make it fit) - it's an email I received a few days ago from Macy's. Does anything jump out at you?macysJenningsJan2

If you didn't catch it, take a look at the subject line of the email - and then look at my name in the byline of this article. Now did you catch it?  

I bet you did. The key here is “Sakalosky” - it appears after my first name in the subject line of the email and it is, in fact, my maiden name. But I haven't been “Jeanne Sakalosky” since February 29, 1992, when I got married. Even when I got divorced in 2010, I kept my married name. So it's been more than 20 years since I've answered to “Jeanne Sakalosky.”

Few people would know, off the top of their heads, that Jeanne Jennings and Jeanne Sakalosky are the same person - certainly fewer than five hundred people in the world; likely less than 100 with the time that has passed.

So how did Macy's know?

Big data is a topic of ongoing discussion in email circles - and one of the biggest of the big data companies is Acxiom. Last year they launched www.aboutthedata.com  to allow people to check the personal data Acxiom held on them. I checked it out last year and checked it again today - my maiden name doesn't appear in my file (note to Acxiom: please don't add it as a result of reading this post!).

So, email geek that I am, how Macy's got my maiden name has been keeping my mind occupied. And I think I know the answer - but it doesn't make me feel all warm and fuzzy inside, like personalization is supposed to. It feels pretty creepy.

I do remember signing up for email from Macy's - I did it as part of a purchase earlier this week. But I know that I did not provide my maiden name. I would have remembered that - if for no other reason than I would have had to spell it for them to get it right (which they did).

When I got married I dropped my original middle name (“Marie”) and moved my maiden name into the void. This is what appears on my amended social security card - “Jeanne Sakalosky Jennings”. But I always just use the middle initial, never my full maiden name - I am “Jeanne S. Jennings,” not “Jeanne Sakalosky Jennings.”

I paid for my purchase with my bank account debit card. My current debit card does not have my maiden name on it. But the previous debit card, which I got when I separated from my husband in 2009 and which expired in the summer of 2013, said “Jeanne Sakalosky Jennings.” I'm guessing this is because I showed my social security card when I opened my solo account.  

I was actually a bit relieved when my maiden name didn't appear on the new debit card I received last summer. It didn't happen often, but I took a bit of ribbing from both friends and strangers when they saw my unusual middle/maiden name on my debit card.

So I think the short answer to how Macy's got my maiden name is that my bank provided it to them. That's all I can think of. Since I used the debit card to pay and I then provided my email address, they must have pulled names from my bank account to personalize the email they've send me.

Which, in this case, is creepy.

So I know what you're thinking. This is an anomaly - in most cases pulling the name from the bank account used to pay for the purchase and tying it to the email provided wouldn't be creepy. I agree. But what's your threshold?

If it's not creepy 51% of the time - but it is creepy 49% of the time, is it worth it? What about 75%/25%? How about 90%/10%? 95%/5%?

We all have our own thresholds. I'm an 80% solution girl myself, most of the time. But I would be lying to you if I didn't say this bothered me, as much as I know about all of this. Having my name of 20+ years ago suddenly appear in an email subject line is creepy.

So what can you do as an email marketer? Think. Think about how you're getting your data - and of what your recipients might think of your personalization once they see it. Will it delight and engage them? Or might it creep them out and concern them?

I've always believed that the best way to get data to personalize your email campaigns is to ask. Ask the recipient what his or her first name is. Ask anything else you might want to use to personalize your campaigns.

Feel free to use observed behavior to customize the content you deliver - but if you're pulling in personal data, just ask. You'll either receive something that won't creep out the recipient when you use it - or the recipient will decline to respond, which tells you that they don't want their email from you personalized in that manner.    


Until next time,


Jeanne

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Jeanne Jennings
Vice President, Global Strategic Services
Alchemy Worx, a 100% Email Marketing Agency


Jeanne Jennings is Vice President of Global Strategic Services at Alchemy Worx, the world’s largest email marketing agency. She is a recognized expert in the email marketing industry with more than 20 years of experience, having started her career with CompuServe in the late 1980s.


She’s been focused on email since 2000, when she was head of email product development for Reed Business Information US, a division of Reed-Elsevier. Prior to joining Alchemy Worx, she ran her own successful email marketing consultancy, focused on strategy, building relationships and improving bottom line performance; clients included AARP, Hasbro, Network Solutions, PRWeb, Scholastic, Verizon, Vocus and WeightWatchers.

Jeanne is an active member of the Email Experience Council, the US DMA’s email marketing arm; she writes a regular column on email marketing for ClickZ.com and her book, The Email Marketing Kit: The Ultimate Email Marketer’s Bible, was published by SitePoint in 2007. Jeanne is a sought-after speaker on email marketing for industry conferences and training workshops. She's based in Washington, DC and is a huge hockey fan – Let’s Go Caps!


With offices in both London and Atlanta, GA, Alchemy Worx provides strategy, planning, design, copywriting, production, testing, reporting, and analysis of email campaigns to a host of top-tier clients. These include Aviva, Carphone Warehouse, Charles Tyrwhitt, Getty Images, Hilton, Kraft, Sony Playstation and Tesco.com. To find out more, please visit: www.alchemyworx.com .

Comments

  • Guest
    Joe Beaulaurier Thursday, 30 January 2014

    Nice Post Jeanne (that is your real name right? ;) ).

    Your timing is good since I've been asked to be part of a panel regarding personal privacy and I'm looking for real-world examples. Another similar case hit mainstream media a couple weeks ago when the mailing label on a direct mail piece for one of the big three office supply chains included a background snippet contained in the list they used. In an unfortunate case, the comment, "daughter killed in car crash," was what appeared in the name/address portion of the mailer. My guess is they were using a telemarketing list which contained such warnings to advise callers to avoid such sensitive topics or in some cases I suppose others would leverage this information. In any event, it rocked the recipient since in fact their daughter had passed the year prior in a car crash.

    The public and the media love to point and howl at such clumsiness as yet another egregious sign of our privacy being stripped away. But when they are recognized by the grocery store cashier and asked how they enjoyed the steaks bought the day before, they are flattered to have been remembered. Silly human race.

  • Guest
    Holly Thursday, 30 January 2014

    I'm curious if you had a wedding registry with Macy's that used your maiden name. They could have had a record with that name on file previously, then appended your new email subscription to it. Maybe there's a bug where the new name you signed up with didn't override the old one...or they have more than one name in your record and chose the wrong one in the personalization field? If either of those are the case, then this might be a little less creepy. :)

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Guest Saturday, 02 August 2014