The Email Marketing Blog

The top thought leaders in email marketing share their insights and thoughts.
Gretchen Scheiman

Email Marketing from Scratch in 6 Steps

Over the last year, I’ve had the opportunity to help build out an entirely new attrition program. An attrition program tries to get customers who have left your product or service to come back – and it goes by a different name in every organization I’ve ever worked with.

Attrition programs are hard to build, just like any other program, and our fabulous team has had our fair share of stumbling blocks. List fails, organizational oddities, you name it, we’ve dealt with it. Along the way, I realized our approach would help build just about any program.

Here are 6 steps to success, no matter the obstacles, when you need to build a new marketing program:

1. Set goals

Goals are pretty important, mostly because you can’t tell everyone how well you did without a goal to hold up against your results. You definitely can’t turn your spectacular fails into hard-won learning opportunities if you don’t have a goal to point to. So it’s a good idea to have a goal.

Pick a metric that is easy to agree on and which you know you can measure. Then set a target that you know you can hit. Businesses are more impressed by teams that can blow away low targets than they are by teams that barely miss (or make) a tough target. Set the bar low. This is probably the last time you’ll be able to do that. Set it as low as you can, the better to exceed it by a wide margin.

...

Share this article:

">
Elliot Ross

The Three Mobile Email Techniques

Did you know that sometimes your users will open email on a mobile device? I know, it was a shock to me too. But here we are in 2015, and after at least 5 “the year(s) of mobile email”, we’ve mostly got past the idea that we have to at least do something to consider this.

There’s plenty of stats and reasons why mobile is important – we won’t focus on those here (though, for the record, it’s around 55% opening on mobile for the average audience). However I have seen a bit of misinformation and confusion around mobile email design lately, so I thought it’d be useful to look at the three main approaches to improve the experience for mobile users.

Spoiler alert: the best approach is to adopt all three.

Mobile Friendly

As a base level, it’s a great idea to incorporate basic mobile friendliness into your design.

What we’re trying to achieve here is essentially a ‘desktop’ email, but one that looks ok and is still usable if appears zoomed out on a mobile device.

...

Share this article:

">
Benjamin Bloom

From Digital Strategist to Digital Marketer: What I learned and What Marketers Need from Consultants

From Digital Strategist to Digital Marketer: What I learned and What Marketers Need from Consultants
by Benjamin Bloom, Director of Digital Engagement, Competitor Group

 

In 2012, after 6 years in strategic planning at various digital agencies, I switched coasts (East to West) and became a client-side digital marketer. Lately, I have been reflecting on the transition - and what other consultants and strategists could take away from that perspective to make clients (like me) more successful.

On landing, I initially tried to operate like a consultant, looking to identify and (helpfully) skewer inefficient and ineffective practices to turn them into best-in-class strategies.  What I found, was that the painstaking deliberation and validation of recommendations was out the window.  Also out the window: perfecting a creative brief, my army of copywriters, producers, and other support team members. If something was going to happen, I’d be the one to do it (or borrow the resources to do so), but I wouldn’t have time to write a 20-slide deck or a detailed SOW.

This was liberating and exhilarating – I stopped waiting for client approval and went and slayed dragons.  I formed deeper relationships with some publishers, entered into beta programs, and tried to use our media budget as leverage.  I learned over time to combine ideation, and execution/measurement into as compact a process as possible.  Here’s a great idea, please buy it, now I’ll go do it, and tell you how it went. Then the deck gets written - after the project wraps up.

Over time, I’ve seen myself fall into the same patterns that used to terrify me as a consultant.  The last-minute rescheduling’s, email sent at odd hours, the requests for impossibly precise case studies and benchmarks. I also pride myself on being as good a partner to my agencies and vendors as I wanted my former clients to be: transparent, open with metrics and strategies, constructively critical.

...

Share this article:

">
Samantha Iodice

So You Want to Start Your Own Email Consultancy? Focus on the Road, Grasshopper

So You Want to Start Your Own Email Consultancy? Focus on the Road, Grasshopper
by Samantha Iodice, Founder & Chief Geek, The Email Maven

SI1Perhaps you lost your job recently, or think you might. Maybe you can’t stand where you’re working and envision something better, greater than where you are. Or, like many, you realize “working for the man” isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. All you want is to do more with your career – drive it where you want to travel. There’s a zillion paths that get you here, to the proverbial fork in the road, to that decision that’s been tickling the front of your mind for so long a time: Starting your own email marketing consultancy.

SI2I was in one of those boats - actually, I was in a couple of boats. It’s difficult to straddle more than one boat at a time, as you can imagine, and that’s the point! At first, I knew I needed to consult, even if just for a while. The old joke is, “you’re not unemployed, you’re a Consultant!” And that’s sort of how I approached it at first.

I was confident I would find an awesome opportunity that I couldn’t turn down, grow my career and have the safety net of a corporate enterprise behind me. And then, I recently realized this was a completely misguided belief. More importantly, I realized it wasn’t what I truly wanted for myself. There’s no surprise who the misguided driver was – fear.

SI3I was afraid to commit to the consultancy and work to grow the brand. It wasn’t just fear of failure – that’s with anything and everyone has it, at least a little bit, even if they say they don’t. I was afraid of screwing it up, which is a bit different than failure. My anxiety would build every time I thought about it. The questions, “can I really be successful on my own?” and, “do I really possess enough knowledge?” and, the worst, “what if I screw it up?” – All of these questions do nothing but undermine your mission, and I started to feed them, rather than bash them in the head with a baseball bat.

SI4I come from a long line of entrepreneurs. My father owned his own Photography business for over 30 years. My Great-grandfather, fresh off the boat from Naples, Italy, worked to save enough dough (pun-intended) to be allowed (by her father) to marry the love of his life. And then, they opened a tavern in upstate New York where he made his own wine, old school bare-foot methodology, and my Great-Grandmother did all the cooking. Clearly, I should really have a bit more confidence in my successful gene-pool, as well as with the Email Marketing database in my head.

...

Share this article:

">
Dela Quist

Deliverability, Engagement, and the Theory of Email Marketing

Deliverability, Engagement, and the Theory of Email Marketing

Ever since the final session at EEC 2015, it’s been a seismic few weeks for the email community when it comes to understanding deliverability from the perspective of the inbox providers. In that session, a seemingly innocuous question from yours truly turned what would have been a worthy, but predictable panel on deliverability featuring 4 major inbox providers (AOL, Comcast, Gmail and Outlook.com) into one of the most controversial and talked about panels in the history of the EEC.

It would be disingenuous to say I wasn’t expecting some controversy to result from my intervention, but even I have been surprised by how visceral the reaction has been. Looking back, I should have been more prepared because my question exposes a deep and enduring fault line within email marketing with a simple word at the heart of it: engagement.

Putting revenue to one side (because everyone claims their approach will lead to more money), the two sides can be broadly defined as follows:

  • Those who believe that engagement is the goal and should be measured by rates such as open, click and unsubscribe (campaign-level metrics).
  • Those who believe that email is like any other marketing channel with the goal of maximizing the number of people who get the message and the number of times they see it, also known as reach and frequency (subscriber-level metrics).

For a fuller understanding of this I would urge you to read this white paper in Digital & Social Media Marketing, authored by me.

The reach and frequency point of view roughly translates into “don’t remove inactives” and “send more email” and this is what drives my detractors mad. Even more so if you do not include the infamous rider that goes with everything I say or write… “and don’t be stupid (#DBS)!”

...

Share this article:

">
Karen Talavera

Insights, Wisdom and Lessons Learned from the 2015 Email Evolution Conference

Earlier this month I had the pleasure of joining many of my fellow Influencers in Miami at the Email Evolution Conference. Hosted annually by the Direct Marketing Association’s Email Experience Council (eec), the event kicks off the email conference year by bringing brands, advocates, vendors and thought leaders together under the south Florida sun to discuss, debate and share innovations and pressing issues central to email marketing.

Here without further ado are key insights, wisdom and lessons learned (including my own) from this year’s event:

Lesson: All Things Old Are New Again

Email Evolution 2015 was a terrific conference – my first since re-entering the email industry last year.  In dozens of conversations as well as the day two keynote and our own breakout session, I was delighted to hear that the professionals in this industry have stayed true to why we leverage email for driving customer engagement: because it offers the highest value channel for treating different customers/subscribers/members/ stakeholders differently.  Personalization may be an old topic, but with today’s technology and access to data we have a chance to actually revolutionize how we talk to each other using email! 

 - Robin Green, VP Sales, PostUp

...

Share this article:

">
Alan O'Rourke

How Adjusting Our Email Pitch Boosted Our Referral Rate from 1.5% to 17.5%

How Adjusting Our Email Pitch Boosted Our Referral Rate from 1.5% to 17.5%

I am 6 months into my new job and new role as Marketing Director at WorkCompass, A B2B SaaS firm selling Performance management and appraisal software. I am the first marketing hire coming fast on the heels of the first sales hire Colm.

So what’s the perfect pitch for our audience?  I had no idea!

The boss Denis had no idea. He had been selling the software to his extended network of contacts for the last year building up the business.

Colm? Nope, he had been hitting his rolodex (is that still a word?) for the last six months. 

Ok so we didn’t know the pitch.  What job role are we selling to? Mmm, ‘everyone’ is not the answer I was hoping for.

...

Share this article:

">
Julia Spano

It's Not What You Say, But How You Say It.

It's Not What You Say, But How You Say It.

“Words matter very much Ms. Barnes, you should care more about them given your profession.”- Francis Underwood (Kevin Spacey of House of Cards)

In the profession of digital marketing, our words matter very much. Words are the pinnacle point of persuasion that drive our consumers to either take an action or ignore our advances. Therefore, our pitches, or messages, warrant much more attention and affection than currently rewarded to them.

As marketers, our typical approach to crafting the “perfect pitch” is a series of random attempts at driving customers to an intended action, endeavoring to tap into their intent and continue the relationship that has already been established. We experiment with a series of variables in our message testing practices to judge whether one word or phrase works better than the other, such as “50% off” instead of “half off,” or “shop today” instead of “sales ends today,” or “You’ll enjoy this” versus “Dear valued customer.” While testing is good, it doesn’t achieve perfection and here’s why:

The Randomness of Creativity

Human generated messages are created randomly… no offense. Let’s take the Mad Men for example… their greatest moments of creative brilliance are conceived in the late whiskey filled hours of a company rendez-vous. Understanding that not every digital campaign needs to be the next “Just Do It,” each is another opportunity for success, or for your next sale. These opportunities, although seemingly less impactful for a business, are the driving force for sustainable revenue. Due to the randomness by which your pitches are created, they begin with guesswork and are inherently limited.

...

Share this article:

">
Only Influencers

Advice for Marketing Agencies: Constructing the Perfect Pitch for Your Audience

Advice for Marketing Agencies: Constructing the Perfect Pitch for Your Audience

The best pitch I’ve ever seen had no design to it, whatsoever.

The potential partnership was with an ad agency well known for amazing designs and creative. The room we walked into was pristine. As a team, they looked crisp, and as individuals they looked like ninjas dressed in black Armani.  The Account Director, their “big guy” for the meeting, introduced his team in specific roles, and in glowing terms. And with each introduction, that member introduced his or her self with a polite thank you, followed with a very strategic statement of why they were in the room, how they would operate in the partnership and their researched approach on how they saw the road ahead. More, they turned to their most likely counterpart on our team, creative to creative, technician to technician, account person to account person, and made sure our team knew their role and best contact. They recited common projects they’d worked on in common roles, by researching my team’s work history and references. They knew more than we did.

It was precision.

During this whole time, there were no slides projected. There were no brochures or other collateral, save for one piece of paper. The Director held it face down on the table and alluded to the importance of what was on the printed side. They had boiled this rather important partnership down to one piece of paper! At every opportunity he teased the room with what was on the printed side, and he patted it like it was his baby.  Frankly, it was.  

By the time the introductions in the room finished its rotation, it was his turn. And, by the time he slid the paper across the long desk for us to see, he knew he’d already won. And so he did.

...

Share this article:

">
Joy Ugi

Tips for an Email Marketer’s First Week on the Job

Starting a new position is usually a challenge, and when that new position is in email marketing, it can be even tougher.

Email marketing is an industry that evolves almost overnight. On top of that, starting at a company means not only learning office dynamics, but how each team and person approaches that company’s email marketing program.

Everyone’s been new at some point, and it’s always a relief to know someone who can give you the inside scoop to help you get a running start in your new position.

An email marketer’s first week on the job isn’t about proving yourself, and it’s not about showing off how much you know.

Instead, the first week of an email marketer’s new position should be spent delving deep into what the industry is and how the company differentiates itself in the industry. Then in following weeks, you can take the email marketing program to the next level.

...

Share this article:

">
david baker

The First 90 Days as an Email Marketer

Have you taken on a new role?  With the average tenure of email marketers at just under those of politicians and CMOs, new leaders and managers need to think about the first 90 days both tactically and strategically.

I love the book “The First 90 Days" by Michael Watkins.  Aside from personalized newborn-baby books, I’ve likely bought more versions of this book as gifts for industry colleagues than any other book.  It's so compelling to me because it made me re-evaluate things I knew intuitively but didn’t quite know how to structure.     

Many people in new jobs remind me of a local 5K race.  When the gun goes off, half the group sprints for the first 100 yards with visions of victory are in their mind, only to fade to a walk/trot after they get out of spectators' view.

The First 90 Days lists 10 core principles, which I wrote down on a yellow Post-It note and taped to my monitor screen. It sat there for close to 5 years: 

  • Promote Yourself
  • Accelerate Your Learning
  • Match Strategy to Execution
  • Secure Early Wins
  • Negotiate Success
  • Achieve Alignment
  • Build Your Team
  • Create Coalitions
  • Keep Your Balance
  • Expedite Everyone

With these principles as your framework, you can dig in to the six most important things you need to do in your first 90 days.

...

Share this article:

">
Chester Bullock

6 Tips for Surviving Your First Week as an Email Marketer

I remember when I learned I was going to be responsible for email marketing for a new employer. My first reaction was “ok, what did I get into?”  After the first bit of panic wore off, I developed a plan to educate myself and get immersed in the channel.  Hopefully the tips below, which are based on how I learned the business, will help those who are new to this wonderful industry.

  1. Make a full commitment
  2. Email marketing is not easy.  Sure, there are all kinds of Top 10 lists that tell you the best day to send, what kind of content people want, or what you should be testing. That makes it seem as though email marketing is more of an exact science than an art. And that could not be further from the truth.  You need to commit to learning as much as you can, and be prepared for it to consume you. To succeed in this business, you have to have an amazing thirst for knowledge, and a time commitment that falls outside the normal 9-5.

  3. Check your fear at the door
  4. Mistakes are going to happen. You are going to feel terrible when one does. A few years into my career, I made a mistake that resulted in our company being in the news for days. I was hoping for a foreign invasion or some other event large enough to move us out of the news cycle, but it never came. Did I think I was going to get fired?  Absolutely.  Did I? No. The people I worked for took it for what it was, and we moved on. The sun came up the next morning, and it didn’t take long to get back in the groove. But the simple fact is that if you’re constantly playing it safe, you’re not going to learn anything. You can’t be afraid of testing different ideas, exploring different platforms, or even of having a conversation. Note: this is not an advisement to embrace recklessness.  That is a different kind of thing entirely, and will have consequences.

  5. Find out who your Email Service Provider (ESP) is
  6. Every ESP is different.  Find out, as soon as you can, what platform you’re going to be using.  Get onto their support website and start learning the basics of the tool, and what its real potential is. Most of these platforms also have a wealth of online research, case studies, and other information you can use to learn how other companies have solved business problems through email marketing.

  7. Identify your competitors
  8. Locate the online properties for your competitors and start asking yourself questions.  “How hard is it to sign up for offers or a newsletter?” “What value are they delivering to their subscribers?” “How often are they sending messages?” Sign up for their campaigns and be aware of what they are doing. You need to differentiate yourself from them, and you cannot do so unless you know what their value proposition is.

    ...

Share this article:

">
Brent Levi

First Week on the Job as an Email Marketer

Email marketing sounds old school; outdated and uncool. Digital marketing is supposed to be about creating cutting edge campaigns that everyone talks about. Email probably isn't what you had in mind as your first digital job, but if you’re lucky enough to have scored that gig, chances are you won't want to leave it now. Your first week will be a whirlwind of learning about clients' campaigns and your company's methodologies.

My journey into email marketing only truly started about 8 months ago. Coming into the new position I was confident that I knew everything I needed to know about the industry. After all, I was the head of marketing at my previous job, responsible for everything marketing. I quickly learned that my knowledge was far less than I thought. I found myself scrambling to catch up. Additionally, I realized I had been doing a poor job at the company I came from (even though I thought I was the best).

The first week on the job can be very stressful, especially when you’re new to email marketing. It took me a few weeks to realize what I needed to do, but I could have figured things out sooner. Here are some tips that can set you up for rapid success the first week on the job.

Ask questions.

Take your questions beyond the basics of campaigns. Ask why things are done the way they are. Why are emails sent the time they are? Why is content worded the way it is? Why are campaigns set up the way they are?

...

Share this article:

">
Bob Frady

Dela is Right

 

"EEC15 proved that Dela and the people who have discovered that sending more results in higher sales - despite the misgivings of a large part of our email community – is absolutely right."

Email engagement doesn’t matter…again

Every once in awhile, dogmas clash.

Tightly held beliefs on one side of the table butt heads with equally held beliefs on the other side. Much like rams, elk or any other animals with hard heads and/or horns, the combatants line up across from each other and whack away. In nearly every one of these challenges, someone wins. Someone loses.

...
Tags:

Share this article:

">
Elliot Ross

Measuring Success in Mobile Email

We need to talk about how we measure success when it comes to mobile email. The email experience today is miles apart from the one ten years ago – there are mobile phones, tablets (is that a mobile device or not?), watches, laptops – yet on the most part we are still using the same success metrics.

This isn’t going to be an article about design tips or how to add “the responsive code”.

Ok it might be a bit. Here’s 5 tips: shorter copy, more white space, nice big easy to tap buttons, simpler column layout, more contrast between colours. Now, I don’t have results to back this up, this is based on 15 years of experience in designing marketing campaigns to effectively communicate a message. Shorter copy and more white space are about making it easier to understand the core message, nice big buttons make it painless to interact and a simpler column layout helps make all of this possible on a smaller screen. The contrast also helps to strengthen the message and draws attention where it is needed when the user is out and likely to have distractions.

We could split test whether this sort of thing works, but our intuition as humans already tells us that making things easier to understand is a good thing to do.

And therein lies our problem – if we only measure the success of our work using opens, clicks or opens-and-clicks-in-an-impressive-equation, we only get a small view of an audience’s behaviour.

...

Share this article:

">
Marco Marini

Why Mobile Matters More Than Ever

Quick: What’s one thing everyone reading this article has in common (other than this article?) We all have a smartphone. Furthermore, I’m fairly certain we’ve all used a smartphone today, either to check email or go on the Internet or both. You might even be reading this on a smartphone. Smartphones and mobile devices have become so prevalent that you can’t walk down the street or into a restaurant without seeing one in use.

We know this as consumers. We live it every day at work and at home, with our colleagues and our families. But are we acting on this knowledge as marketers?

Proof that mobile is the new normal
The mobile shopping statistics of Thanksgiving Day 2014 should have skyrocketed mobile to the top of every marketer’s priority list, if it wasn’t there already. Only consider the Thanksgiving and Black Friday numbers:

  • Three out of five people shopping online on Thanksgiving Day were doing so on mobile devices.(source)
  • On Thanksgiving Day, mobile devices accounted for 2 million visits, 30,000 orders and $4 million in revenue. (source)
  • Compared to Thanksgiving Day 2013, the mobile market share of all online revenue increased 55%. (source)
  • On Black Friday 2014, 47% of online traffic came from mobile devices, up 24.2% from the same day last year. (source)

Yet less than half of the major retailers were mobile first in their marketing. According to Chad White, “On or around Black Friday, only 47% of major retailers sent promotional emails that used either mobile-aware or responsive design.”That’s right: Less than half of marketers were ready for this mobile shopping spree.

Mobile is a contender all year long
Obviously 2015 is the year marketers need to get going on mobile and responsive design. Although Thanksgiving Day is now a huge shopping day for online retailers, consumers shop all year long—and marketers email them all year long.

...

Share this article:

">
Samantha Iodice

Don’t Let Cupid’s Arrow Miss You! Connect with Subscribers and Share Some Love

It’s that time again…. I dread it each year. The hearts everywhere in every color, sequin and bobble, Cupid with his stinging arrows, the flowers – don’t get me started on the flowers! Every year since pretty much my tween’s, I’ve hated Valentine’s Day. Don’t get me wrong, the idea of it is lovely – Romance, love, and all that, it’s, well, a beautiful thing. But, I really don’t enjoy the constant barrage of pink and red love with every breath and every turn.

This perspective shouldn’t detract from a simple fact: Valentine’s Day is a great Email opportunity. Everyone feels differently at different holidays. I’m sure plenty of Chanukah and Christmas emails are received by subscribers that would prefer the other version, those who do not celebrate the “pagan” Halloween holiday likely receive such themed emails, and Valentine grumps, like me, receive plenty of Valentine emails. It’s the content and the purpose that make it a wonderful way to connect with your subscribers.

Oddly enough, even when I get the more romantic variety of Valentine email, I’m not usually put off by it – when it’s done well and on brand. When a brand is pushing outside their established identity and make zero relevant connection between content and contact, then I use them as the “do NOT repeat” type of email example. But often, many brands use the angle of being “over the Cupid thing”, and that’s something I can totes relate to.

For instance, Uncommon Goods did a superb job at reminding people to love – and treat – themselves (and to tell Cupid to shove off):

sam2-15SUBJECT LINE: Tired of Cupid?

...

Share this article:

">
david baker

Valentine's Day Emails that Offer More than a Shopping Experience

I love my Toilet Paper

Years ago in a brand discussion with a CPG company, the challenge of the day was  “ How do you build engagement with consumers?” and “How do you build a loyalty program from that?” The product was toilet paper!   You can imagine all the tongue in cheek jokes about the relationships you have with T-Paper.   And nothing shows love like Valentines Toilet Paper: 

baker1-15This is a very real question for brands to address and when seasonal events as emotional as Valentine’s day, you have to rethink what is the context for the relation.  Are we solely selling products to consumers or are we also trying to immerse our customers in our brand through this event?”

The best tips I can give you this holiday season is to spur your creativity with example of past programs that did more than offered shopping experiences.   Given it’s less than a month out, it’s still not too late to use your brand as the experience vs. selling products to augment the experience.  Not everyone has a power brand like Tiffany’s. 

Here’s a few I like:     

...

Share this article:

">
Daniel Puckett

7 Tips to Nail Your Valentine’s Day Email Campaign

Not in the business of hearts, perfume or roses? No biggie, you can still crush it with your V-Day campaign.

Did you know that people are willing to spend on average $130.97 on Valentine’s Day for their significant other (US National Retail Federation)? Heck, 3% of pet owners will even give Valentine’s Day gifts to their pets! That’s why you are missing out on some big bucks if you aren’t crafting killer V-Day email campaigns, even if you aren’t a jewelry store or chocolate shop. Here are 7 tips on creating an incredible Valentine’s Day email, for ANY company or product.

Craft a killer subject line.

Valentine’s Day email volume is second only to the Christmas holiday season and your subject line is your first (and perhaps only) chance to make an impression. With buckets of email campaigns landing in your reader’s inbox, you need to ensure your subject line crushes it. 

Experian Marketing Services found that the key features of the highest performing subject lines during V-Day were gift and card ‘ideas,’ personalized greetings, including a heart symbol and using the word ‘sweet.’ So, keep those ideas front of mind when you are looking to catch they eye of your reader.

...

Share this article:

">
Robin Green

Nine Great Ways to Fall in Love with Email Again

Email. It’s “antiquated,” always on the verge of dying and if you ask what the internet thinks of email marketing you will find that 74.9% find it negative. Yet 66% of B2C marketing professionals still maintain that email is the most effective channel to reach and engage customers.  Our job as email marketers is to continually drive engagement and grow this high ROI channel. This Valentine’s Day let’s get back to the basics and take a look at nine great best practices we can follow to fall in love with email again.

Get on a Schedule

Sheesh – wasn’t it just Christmas last week?  Indeed, Valentine’s Day sneaks up on us (especially guys) and before you know it, it’s here.  As marketers, we can use email in strategic and timely ways to get ahead of that curve.  Digital marketer Oneupweb has reported top online sales typically occur February 5-6. That corresponds with other research we’ve seen which reports Valentine e-mails peaking at an average of 2.9 a week for the week ending February 4. That same period also sees the first President's Day and St. Patrick's Day e-mails.  There’s a lot of noise this time of year!

When should you start reminding your subscribers about your various offers and promotions?  Three weeks out isn’t too soon.  A month?  Even better.  One week out? It’s peak time and you’re competing for inbox attention.  A great best practice I’ve seen is creating a drip series with a beginning and ending date, giving subscribers the option in the first message to let you know how often they want your offers.  They’ll thank you for that.

Know Your Reader

...

Share this article:

">

Insights from Todays Leading Email Marketing Experts and Thoughtleaders